chapter V

when baking, follow directions.. when cooking, go by your own taste.. ~ Laiko Bahrs

made in MyKitchen | sogogi kimchi jeongol / Korean beef & kimchi stew

the furbabies were somewhere around the house, curled up and in hibernating mode for the rest of the cold day.. the air, damp and freezing (for me.. :sad: ), just the way hubs loves it..  i thought dinner wouldn’t be perfect without a spicy soup or stew dish to warm the toes.. and heart~ :D

it was just about noon and the drizzly rain just stopped.. i took out the pack of beef strip from the freezer to start thawing in the kitchen.. also a small jar of kimchi that i specifically set aside especially for this kind of dish.. dishes that use aged cabbage  kimchi.. that jar’s been sitting in the fridge for over two months now and looks and tastes just about ‘ripe’ enough.. normally, when i make cabbage kimchi, i put some in smaller jars to age longer than the bigger batch.. really sour aged cabbage kimchi is great for stews and kimchi bokumbap/fried rice..

i was hard set on making korean beef and kimchi stew, or sogogi kimchi jeongol.. it’s a type of stew unlike a jigae.. jigae consists of a main ingredient that is included in the dish’s namesake, like kimchi jigae (kimchi), cheonggook jang jigae (fermented soybean) or dwenjang jigae (fermented soybean, tofu and clams).. jigae is usually prepared and boiled on the spot at the dining table..

jeongol, on the other hand, is cooked over low heat for a long duration of time..  it contains a variety of main ingredients.. in Korea, jeongol was a dish originally for the upper class folks and the royals, while jigae was for commoners.. jeongol usually contains a small amount of broth and cooked in a jeongolteul, a pot specifically used for cooking it.. if you visit a Korean supermart, you can find it in the cooking tools section..

varieties of jeongol include haemul jeongol (seafood), mandu jeongol (mandu/dumpling), dubu jeongol (tofu) and beoseot jeongol (shrooms).. and of course, the one i prepared earlier, sogogi jeongol (beef)..

the wonderful aroma (from the combination of mirin/Japanese rice wine, gochujang/Korean red pepper paste and lemongrass~)wafting from the pot throughout the house was enough to make me hungry ahead of the meal time and when it was done cooking, i couldn’t resist helping myself to a small bowl of the stew while watching a Korean drama that i follow regularly.. :mrgreen:

elaborate stews like jeongol tastes better when it sits for quite some time, prior to consumption.. sometimes, i use leftover spicy jeongol as a base for noodle soup.. just dilute it with water and add perhaps an egg.. some veg.. a bit of oyster sauce.. and dried noodles of choice.. and voila~! instant yumminess in a bowl, perfect for lunch~ :mrgreen:

SOGOGI KIMCHI JEONGOL / KOREAN BEEF & KIMCHI STEW

Ingredients :

  • slightly fatty beef, cut into slices
  • aged/old cabbage kimchi
  • fresh shiitake mushrooms, sliced
  • red onion, quartered
  • a few lemongrass stalks, crushed

  • garlic + ginger, minced or crushed

  • spring onion, chopped into 1 inch pieces

  • mirin/Japanese rice wine
  • gochugaru (Korean red pepper flakes)
  • gochujang (korean red pepper paste)
  • a bit of fish sauce
  • oyster sauce
  • water

Method :

  • marinate the beef slices with some mirin and set aside for about 15 minutes or so

  • in a bowl, mix equal amounts of gochugaru, gochujang and oyster sauce with a bit of fish sauce to form a thick paste or sauce. set aside

  • heat up some oil in a heavy bottom pot and saute garlic+ginger until fragrant
  • add in kimchi and stir fry until it’s quite dried up
  • add in marinated beef slices and stir fry for a bit until it’s half cooked or so

  • then, add in shiitake shrooms, red onion, lemongrass, the mixed sauce, and water to just about cover everything
  • let the mixture come to a boil on medium-high heat for 5-10 minutes
  • turn the heat down to low and let the stew boil away until the liquid is reduced quite a bit. it’s entirely up to you how much you prefer the liquid to reduce
  • last of all, add in spring onions and cover the pot for another minute or two

  • turn the heat off
  • serve, and enjoy

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